Sundeala Story 1

1898

The Sundeala Story

Sundeala starts life as the Patented Impermeable Millboard Company Ltd when Daniel M Sutherland begins to manufacture the very first Fibreboard (originally known as Millboard) in Sunbury-on-Thames from discarded softwood and fabric scraps, pulped with well water to release the cellulose fibres.

Sundeala Story 1

PIM board is used in the doors of the 1902 State Landau, built by Messrs Hooper for King Edward VII and first used by The King on the day of his coronation procession through London.

In 1909, industrialist Eugenius H. Outerbridge founds the ‘Agasote Millboard Company’ (Later to become Homasote) in association with Manson Sutherland, Daniel Sutherland’s eldest son, bringing the patented recycled manufacturing process from England to New Jersey, USA.

1900s

Sundeala Story image 02

1910s

PIM, impregnated with linseed oil to make it weatherproof, is used in the construction of a large Red Cross hutted hospital at the rear of Netley Hospital, Southampton, expanding the medical site to 2,500 beds.

PIM also becomes widely used in Ocean Liners,  as the primary panel material in Railway carriages and, approaching the close of WW1, in the framework of areoplane wings.

Sundeala Story image 03
Sundeala Story image 04
Sundeala Story 2

1920s

In 1921 the board is called Sundeala for the first time, named for Sunbury-on-Thames and ‘deal’ for the name given to softwood in the trade.

Sundeala K quality, named for the chief chemist, Ken Sutherland, began to be widely used as a decorative internal cladding which would become popular in domestic construction throughout the next two decades.

Sundeala Story image 05

During WW II the Sunbury Mill was geared to defence requirements. As well as being used for extensive repairs due to air raid damage, the Government also called for special panels to line the holds of refridgerated ships to protect food supplies from the USA to the UK.

Sundeala also became popular as an art canvas, used by Francis Bacon as a canvas for many works including Three Studies for Figures at the Base of a Crucifixion, C.1944 using oils and pastels (now on display at the Tate London).

1940s

Sundeala Story image 06

1950s

The introduction of cheap, insubstantial wood fibre board leads to collaboration between Sundeala and the British Government to create the first British Standard for fibre board classification to address safety issues rife in the construction industry.

1960s

Sundeala Soverign Hardboard capacity is bought up exclusively to supply the British car manufacturing industry, widely used by British Leyland and Jaguar in panels, dashboard facias and parcel shelves.

1980s

The Buildings Act 1984 sees the introduction of fire safety into National Building Regulations. Sundeala, having always been inherently fire resistant, innovates a higher class of fire resistant board, becoming known as Sundeala FR – a  Class O fire rated board for use in areas deemed to be fire critical.

Sundeala Story 3

1990s

In 1992, as a result of the influx of cheap MDF and plasterboard imports, Sundeala hardboards are retired and the company is bought by Celotex who retains the Sundeala Medium board that is still in high demand throughout the country for use as a display surface in the education sector.

2000s

In response to the increasingly poor environmental credentials of the Sunbury manufacturing facility and the growing expense of labour in the area due to Heathrow, Sundeala relocates the factory in 2001 to a decommissioned Shoeboard Mill in Cam, Gloucestershire.

In 2002 a management buyout sees Sundeala demerge with Celotex to become an independent company.

2010s

Sundeala purchased TeacherBoards 1985 Ltd in 2015, merging to become the UK’s largest manufacturer of presentation and display products.

Sundeala joins with MPs and the Parliamentary All Safety Fire Committee to expose the dangerous use of flammable wood fibre board throughout schools in the UK. The UK building regulations are reformed in 2019 to eliminate the use of the BS 476 test for wall linings as insufficient to test combustibility.

Manufacturing innovation and commercial collaboration sees the use of Sundeala broaden into acoustic construction materials, specialist protective flooring for listed buildings and packaging for precious alloys.

Sundeala Story 4

2020

Building on years of research and development, Sundeala begins extensive trials on a product recognised by UK Research and Innovation as a ‘game-changing’ innovation in a bid to aid the large scale reduction of construction waste and battle the use of materials containing harmful formaldehydes, rosins and other chemical binders.

Sundeala joins the fight against the Covid-19 pandemic supplying environmentally friendly, recyclable screens to assist with the safe management of re-opening of education and commercial spaces.

MOBILE VERSION STARTS HERE

Sundeala Story 2

1898

Sundeala starts life as the Patented Impermeable Millboard Company Ltd when Daniel M Sutherland begins to manufacture the very first Fibreboard (originally known as Millboard) in Sunbury-on-Thames from discarded softwood and fabric scraps, pulped with well water to release the cellulose fibres.

Sundeala Story image 03

1900s

PIM board is used in the doors of the 1902 State Landau, built by Messrs Hooper for King Edward VII and first used by The King on the day of his coronation procession through London.

In 1909, industrialist Eugenius H. Outerbridge founds the ‘Agasote Millboard Company’ (Later to become Homasote) in association with Manson Sutherland, Daniel Sutherland’s eldest son, bringing the patented recycled manufacturing process from England to New Jersey, USA.

1910s

PIM, impregnated with linseed oil to make it weatherproof, is used in the construction of a large Red Cross hutted hospital at the rear of Netley Hospital, Southampton, expanding the medical site to 2,500 beds.

PIM also becomes widely used in Ocean Liners,  as the primary panel material in Railway carriages and, approaching the close of WW1, in the framework of areoplane wings.

Sundeala Story image 02

1920s

In 1921 the board is called Sundeala for the first time, named for Sunbury-on-Thames and ‘deal’ for the name given to softwood in the trade.

Sundeala K quality, named for the chief chemist, Ken Sutherland, began to be widely used as a decorative internal cladding which would become popular in domestic construction throughout the next two decades.

Sundeala Story image 05

1940s

During WW II the Sunbury Mill was geared to defence requirements. As well as being used for extensive repairs due to air raid damage, the Government also called for special panels to line the holds of refridgerated ships to protect food supplies from the USA to the UK.

Sundeala also became popular as an art canvas, used by Francis Bacon as a canvas for many works including Three Studies for Figures at the Base of a Crucifixion, C.1944 using oils and pastels (now on display at the Tate London).

Sundeala Story image 06

1950s

The introduction of cheap, insubstantial wood fibre board leads to collaboration between Sundeala and the British Government to create the first British Standard for fibre board classification to address safety issues rife in the construction industry.

1960s

Sundeala Soverign Hardboard capacity is bought up exclusively to supply the British car manufacturing industry, widely used by British Leyland and Jaguar in panels, dashboard facias and parcel shelves.

Sundeala Story 3

1980s

The Buildings Act 1984 sees the introduction of fire safety into National Building Regulations. Sundeala, having always been inherently fire resistant, innovates a higher class of fire resistant board, becoming known as Sundeala FR – a  Class O fire rated board for use in areas deemed to be fire critical.

1990s

In 1992, as a result of the influx of cheap MDF and plasterboard imports, Sundeala hardboards are retired and the company is bought by Celotex who retains the Sundeala Medium board that is still in high demand throughout the country for use as a display surface in the education sector.

Sundeala Story 4

2000s

In response to the increasingly poor environmental credentials of the Sunbury manufacturing facility and the growing expense of labour in the area due to Heathrow, Sundeala relocates the factory in 2001 to a decommissioned Shoeboard Mill in Cam, Gloucestershire.

In 2002 a management buyout sees Sundeala demerge with Celotex to become an independent company.

2010s

Sundeala purchased TeacherBoards 1985 Ltd in 2015, merging to become the UK’s largest manufacturer of presentation and display products.

Sundeala joins with MPs and the Parliamentary All Safety Fire Committee to expose the dangerous use of flammable wood fibre board throughout schools in the UK. The UK building regulations are reformed in 2019 to eliminate the use of the BS 476 test for wall linings as insufficient to test combustibility.

Manufacturing innovation and commercial collaboration sees the use of Sundeala broaden into acoustic construction materials, specialist protective flooring for listed buildings and packaging for precious alloys.

Sundeala Story 5

2020s

Building on years of research and development, Sundeala begins extensive trials on a product recognised by UK Research and Innovation as a ‘game-changing’ innovation in a bid to aid the large scale reduction of construction waste and battle the use of materials containing harmful formaldehydes, rosins and other chemical binders.

Sundeala joins the fight against the Covid-19 pandemic supplying environmentally friendly, recyclable screens to assist with the safe management of re-opening of education and commercial spaces.

MOBILE VERSION FINISHES HERE

How can we help?

If you have a question about Sundeala Boards, need a quote for one of our products or want to talk about circular manufacturing and how we can work together, please drop us a line and one of our expert team will get in touch as soon as possible!

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